Tuesday, July 11, 2017

I LOVE the company I'm keeping!


 I was delighted to find A Buss from Lafayette included in a short summer reading list posted on the Grateful American Foundation website. I was doubly delighted when I saw the other books listed there!













A big thank you to David Bruce Smith, who is doing so much to hook kids on history! He has established the Grateful American Foundation, which gives an annual award for the best fiction or non-fiction history book for kids. He has also created the GratefulAmericanKids website, which has many fun articles, pictures, videos, etc. to engage young people's interest in history.

 Check out this wonderful video entitled "Grateful American Kids Rock!"

Cheers,

Dorothea



Friday, June 30, 2017

Where Washington Met Lafayette: The City Tavern Revisited!






 The City Tavern 
138 South 2nd St
Philadelphia, PA






The City Tavern is the spot where General Washington first met the 19-year-old French volunteer, the Marquis de Lafayette. The childless Washington and the fatherless Lafayette eventually became such close friends that many described them as being like father and son.

My family lived close to Philadelphia for five years in the 1970s. We moved there just a day or two before the Bicentennial, July 4, 1976.  (On the day itself, we took the train into Center City, and en route we joined all the other passengers in singing "Happy Birthday" to the USA!) During our time in Pennsylvania, we went many times to the City Tavern, Independence Hall, Valley Forge, the site of the Battle of Brandywine, etc.  Those experiences so whetted my interest in the Revolution that I ended up writing two historical novels about it for young readers, The Riddle of Penncroft Farm and A Buss from Lafayette. In Riddle, I set two scenes, one "modern" and one during the American Revolution, at the City Tavern.

In fact, someone (no idea who) put a reference to this on Wikipedia:


We moved from Philadelphia to Minnesota in 1981 (that's where I wrote Riddle), and it wasn't until 1991 that I had a chance to visit The City Tavern again. Here is a picture from that visit.


At the time, I imagined that the door to the right of the staircase went down to a basement, and I had Geordie's brother, Will come up from the basement through that door. I learned on this visit that it actually goes out to a back yard. Oops.







Several weeks ago, my husband and I dined at the City Tavern for the first time in many years. It was such fun! I brought along a copy of The Riddle of Penncroft so I should shamelessly pose with it in the pix below.
Here I am sitting on a settle at The City Tavern. I asked my husband to take this photo because of the reference to settles in The Riddle of Penncroft Farm.

I cleared and wiped the table, then swept the plank floor while Aunt Cass did the dishes. Then she picked up a sweater and put it on. “Better wear your jacket,” she said. “Sandra put it in one of the settles last night.”
 

“Huh?”

“The settles—those high-backed benches. The seats open up. That’s where I keep“open up. That’s where I keep hats and mittens and things.”


I flipped open one of the wooden benches. My jacket was inside. “It looks like my coat is already settled in,” I punned.
 

“You’re a punster—good,” remarked Aunt Cass without a glimmer of a smile. “Always liked puns; never much good at making ’em up. Come on.” She pushed open the door and we went outside.” 
- The Riddle of Penncroft Farm, © 1989 by Dorothea Jensen


Finally, a couple of members of the costumed waitstaff were obliging enough to be in this picture.

Anyway, I highly recommend that you visit The City Tavern sometime. The food is delicious, and the setting really does "bring history alive."

But I also highly recommend that you read The Riddle of Penncroft Farm first!

I am shamelessly including buy links to make it easy for you - here they are:

Amazon

Bookdepository.com

(It is also available as an e-book on Amazon, B & N, Kobo, etc.)

Cheers,

Dorothea

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Kid Stuff!


Today I received a copy of Kid Stuff (Upper Valley) Magazine, which is aimed at parents in New Hampshire and Vermont. It lists many interesting events in these states that parents might want to enjoy with their children. (It is distributed free at various stores around the region.)

I am happy to report that the 2017 summer edition also includes a lovely review, written by Hayley Durfor, of my new historical novel for young readers about General Lafayette (among other topics), A Buss from Lafayette. I am posting this review below (with permission from the magazine).

My favorite part? When Hayley says this:

"A Buss from Lafayette will entertain readers as young as 4th grade, while older students will appreciate a teenager's perspective."

I couldn't have described the "target market" for my story any better myself!

Many thanks to Hayley Durfor and to Amy Cranage, Associate Editor of Kid Stuff!

Cheers,

Dorothea

 

Monday, June 5, 2017

An Almost 60-year-old Duh Moment

I first read Elizabeth Marie Pope's The Sherwood Ring in 1958 when I was in the eighth grade. Along with The Witch of Blackbird Pond, this book has remained one of my favorites. In fact, when I wrote my first historical novel for young readers, The Riddle of Penncroft Farm, I consciously and unconsciously modeled elements of my story after The Sherwood Ring as a kind of homage in its honor.

I enjoy word plays/puns and the like. When I was writing my story, I discovered that there was an antique farm tool (a kind of large sieve) called a "riddle". (One of the few extant uses of this in English today is "riddled with bullets", meaning full of holes like a sieve.) As soon as I heard such an implement existed, I made a point of 1. making one of these a key part of my plot and 2. putting it into my title, so that its double meaning would (as I like to think of it) reverberate nicely.

A Riddle
So you may imagine my chagrin when I suddenly realized that Elizabeth Marie Pope did something similar more than half a century ago when she named her story The Sherwood Ring.

And I totally missed it!

Until now.

Ok, in my own defense, I would like to say that I was blinded by the fact that there is an actual Sherwood ring in the story, the kind worn on the finger. But what I did NOT think about was that the whole story centers on Peaceable Sherwood, a super-competent British officer, assigned with the task of coordinating local Tories (in upstate New York) into a secret fighting force.

I believe that such a secret group of men is called a ring.

So this book's title, The Sherwood Ring, is a double-meaning word play exactly like what I did in The Riddle of Penncroft Farm.

Duh.  



Saturday, May 20, 2017

Honoring Lafayette on Lafayette Day!



May 20, is the anniversary of the 1834 death of America's great Revolutionary War hero, General Lafayette.  In Massachusetts (and New Hampshire) this is proclaimed Lafayette Day. Yesterday the Massachusetts Lafayette Society laid a wreath at the Lafayette memorial plaque on Boston Common. This is located on the side of the Common called "Lafayette Mall". The reason for this title? This was the walkway lined by hundreds and hundreds of schoolchildren who welcomed Lafayette when he arrived in Boston in 1825 to (among other things) dedicate the Bunker Hill Memorial.

It was my great honor to assist Judith Cauilliou, from the French Consulate in Boston, to place the wreath.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

An award for A BUSS FROM LAFAYETTE!

 I was nosing around the internet today to see if there was anything new about my book, A Buss from Lafayette and I stumbled across this!

Woo hoo!

(I don't even care that they spelled my name wrong.)

:  )

Dorothea

Woo Hoo! An Award for Buss!

Once in awhile (well, every day, actually) I do a search to see if anything new has popped up on my book, A Buss from Lafayette.

This is what I found today:


















Yes, yes, I know my name is spelled wrong, but I don't care! It is just so delightful to find out that some award program liked my book.

Here is some info about the eLit Awards:

Here's info about this award program:
The eighth annual eLit Awards are a global awards program committed to illuminating and honoring the very best of English language digital publishing entertainment.

The eLit Awards celebrate the ever growing market of electronic publishing in the wide variety of reader formats. Hail the revolutionary world of e-books and join the awards program that’s highlighting the best in electronic reading entertainment.

 Thank you eLit!